Book Now

Castles

Thoresby Hall Warner Leisure Hotels, is not too far away from some great castles.

Newark Castle, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Newark Castle, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire

Newark Castle, Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire, remains of medieval royal castle, started in the mid-12th century. The castle belonged to King John, and it was here that he died in 1216 following his infamous "surfeit of peaches". Following the English Civil War the castle was slighted and left derelict. Some restoration of the buildings began in the 1840s.

Lincoln Castle, Lincoln, Lincolnshire

Lincoln Castle, Lincoln, Lincolnshire

One of the better preserved castles in England, the castle was started in 1068, just two years after the Norman Conquest. One of the first structures on the site was the Lucy Tower motte and bailey, to which another motte and stone walls were added early in the 12th century. The outer bailey stretched around the entire medieval city of Lincoln. For 900 years it operated as a court and prison, its early prisoners suffering execution on the castle ramparts. Still home to the Crown Courts, the castle is open to the public as a museum and displays an original copy of the Magna Carta. Restricted opening times and entrance charges apply.

Bolsover Castle, Bolsover, Derbyshire

Bolsover Castle, Bolsover, Derbyshire

Built by the Peverel family in the 12th century, the castle became Crown property when the family line died out. Following a siege in 1217, it deteriorated into a ruin. The manor and castle were purchased by Sir George Talbot in 1553, who set about re-building it for elegant living rather than defence. Slighted during the Civil War, it again fell into a ruinous state. William Cavendish had the castle restored to good order by the time of his death in 1676. Restricted opening times and entrance charges apply.

Peveril Castle, Castleton, Derbyshire

Peveril Castle, Castleton, Derbyshire

Ruined late medieval castle. Set high on a hill above the village of Castleton the stronghold, formerly known as Peak Castle, was built by William Peveril around 1080, shortly after the Norman Conquest of England. The original wooden fortress was soon rebuilt in stone and was used in 1157 for a meeting between Henry I and King Malcolm of Scotland. The castle gradually fell into disuse after the 14th century. Restricted opening times and entrance charges apply.

Conisbrough Castle, Conisbrough, Yorkshire

Conisbrough Castle, Conisbrough, Yorkshire

Well-preserved 12th century keep, this 13th century castle is said to have been the inspiration for Sir Walter Scott's novel 'Ivanhoe'. Fortified by earthworks, the first castle on the site would have been little more than a wooden palisade, built soon after the Norman Conquest by William of Warenne. This was replaced by the current stone structure by Hamelin Plantagenet, King Henry II's half-brother, sometime in the late 11th century. Considered to be the first example of a circular stone keep in England; previously keeps were either square or rectangular in design. Shortly after the four storey keep was finished, a stone curtain wall was added. The castle gradually fell out of use during the 15th century. Restricted opening times and entrance charges apply.

Add Your Link

Placeholder Picture
Placeholder Picture
Placeholder Picture
Placeholder Picture
Placeholder Picture
Placeholder Picture